Interview with Rudy Ricciotti, architect of the Footbridge of Peace in Seoul

Architect Rudy Ricciotti was one of the first to utilize the technical and artistic potential provided by Ductal® designing a long-span pedestrian bridge the "Footbridge of Peace in Seoul". Now, he plans to put the material's potential to work again, in the grids on the façades of the future Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilizations in Marseille.

 

When and how did you discover Ductal®?

I actually discovered Ductal® several years ago and was immediately struck by the intelligence of the material, recognizing its true vocation. Innovation always comes from scientific transversally - and here, we are dealing with chemistry, the physics of solids and technology, the adventure is fascinating.

 

I was immediately struck by the intelligence of the material, recognizing its true vocation.

Rudy Ricciotti
 

What construction sites have you used it on?

I used this material in Korea, for footbridge in Seoul, (an arch that spans the river). Currently, we are using it in the design phase for the National Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilizations in Marseille, and for a private home.

Which of Ductal®'s qualities do you consider to be the most important and the most useful for an architect?

I think true invention could be based on the use of this material. From the architect's point of view, the strong compressive values challenge the modernists' convictions. The importance of compression will return to center stage in the structural designs, but also involve a break with the modern movement and the same will be true of bending. As the material has extremely low porosity, it will be a source of surprises; bringing to mind the tightness that is one consequence and should strengthen the search for a new return to structuralism and a quest for the beauty of concrete.

 

Get in touch
with our sales team